Rosen, INIVA 01 Rosen, INIVA 02 Rosen, INIVA 03

Roee Rosen, Vile, Evil Veil, INIVA, Rivington Place Storefront, installation views, London, 2012

Rosen, INIVA 07 Rosen, INIVA 08

Roee Rosen, Vile, Evil Veil, INIVA, Rivington Place Storefront, installation views, London, 2012

Roee Rosen, Live and Die as Eva Braun # 69, 2012 (one of five new pieces added to the mid 90s project, and used for the making of a storefront piece for INIVA, Rivington Place, London) High-res

Roee Rosen, Live and Die as Eva Braun # 69, 2012 (one of five new pieces added to the mid 90s project, and used for the making of a storefront piece for INIVA, Rivington Place, London)

Roee Rosen, Edible Philippine Workers, 2007 High-res

Roee Rosen, Edible Philippine Workers, 2007

Roee Rosen, Out (Tse), 34:30 minutes, 2010

Maxim Komar-Myshkin: “Vladimir’s Night”

2011-2014

Maxim Komar-Myshkin’s Vladimir’s Night is a hybrid of a children book, an exceedingly gory martyrdom and, perhaps, a twisted political treatise. Here, Vladimir (Putin, although the name is never mentioned), is both a little child and a political leader vacating in his summer mansion. Before falling asleep he is joined in bed by numerous animated objects. What begins as merry frolicking soon turns violent; Vladimir is molested, tortured and finally murdered by them. 

Komar-Myshkin was the pseudonym of the fictive Russian poet Efim Poplavsky (1978-2011), who immigrated to Tel Aviv in the early 2000’s. There, he founded the Buried Alive Group, a collective of ex-Soviet artists, writers and film makers who disavowed the culture around them and seeked a zombie-like artistic existence. Suffering from acute paranoia, Poplavsky believed that Putin had a personal vendetta against him, and that his assassination was pertinent. The album, an artistic revenge of sorts, was created in secrecy and discovered after Poplavsky committed suicide.

Vladimir’s Night continues both the tradition of Russian illustrated books and that of the albums created by Moscow’s unofficial artists of the 1970s, such as Kabakov and Pivovarov. It also contains a plethora of allusions and references, disclosing, perhaps, its author’s conspiratorial perception. The publication and exhibition of the work will thus be accompanied not only by an English translation of the poem, but by an expansive annotation that will also narrate Poplavsky’s short life.

The potentials of fictive identities expand here to include a small community: The Buried Alive and their collective production: a manifesto and videos, supposedly produced throughout the 2000s. These are presented both as autonomous pieces, and as a longer compilation, The Buried Alive Videos (2013). A feature film wherein the album is transformed into an operetta is in the making.

imageThe Buried Alive Emblem

1
Vladimir is at his summer mansion.He is having dinner.
Maxim Komar-Myshkin, Vladimir’s Night # 1 High-res

1

Vladimir is at his summer mansion.
He is having dinner.

Maxim Komar-Myshkin, Vladimir’s Night # 1

2
With Vladimir is his best girlfriend.She loves him so much that she serves the meal dressed as a dog.
Maxim Komar-Myshkin, Vladimir’s Night # 2 High-res

2

With Vladimir is his best girlfriend.
She loves him so much that she serves the meal dressed as a dog.

Maxim Komar-Myshkin, Vladimir’s Night # 2

Out (“Tse”)

Video, 34 minutes, 2010

Out presents a domination/ submission scene set in a mundane living room. The increasing pain prompts the sub to spew out not only cries of pleasure and pain, but also sentences. The scene thus connotes both confessions under torture, and rituals of exorcism, even as it remains a documentation of willful pleasure, being that both participants are not actresses, but members of the Israeli BDSM community.The demon who speaks through the sub, is and isn’t herself. In fact, the sentences are all quotes of Israel’s minister of foreign affairs, Avigdor Lieberman, one of the most extreme right wing politicians in Israel. 

The ritual is framed by two scenes. A preceding interview with the two participants seems at the beginning to be a straightforward documentary, but transforms into an exposition of the narrative premise by which one is possessed, the other an exorcist. The final musical scene is a song set to the words of the Russian poet Esenin’s Letter to Mother. Executed as a one-shot, the song is a direct, if twisted, homage to the final scene of another film that deals with radical sexuality and politics: Dusan Makavejev’s WR, The Mystery of the Organism.

Awards:
Orizzonti award, best medium-length film, The 67th Venice Film Festival
ARTE Award for best European film, Oberhausen Kurzfilmtage
First prize, Bucharest International Experimental Film Festival
Official nomination for the European Academy Awards, Sarajevo Film Festival
Special mention, CPH:DOX